A Business Systems Analyst Explains His Plan to Boost Team Productivity Post-Coronavirus

A Business Systems Analyst Explains His Plan to Boost Team Productivity Post-Coronavirus

By Suzy Strutner, managing editor
5-minute read

DuraMark, a printer of safety labels and branding decals, is making processes more efficient to prepare for getting back to full production capacity.

In short:

  • At DuraMark, which prints stick-on decals for heavy machinery, business slowed down due to the coronavirus.

  • The business systems team is taking advantage of the downturn to introduce new processes to DuraMark’s production team while they’re not as busy.

  • The new systems can allow DuraMark to emerge from the coronavirus as a stronger company, says its business systems analyst.


There’s no doubt that the majority of leaders at growing companies saw business suffer as a result of the coronavirus.

However, we’ve seen some especially forward-thinking teams position themselves to emerge from the downturn stronger than before, regardless of their company’s bottom line. 

Such is the case for the business systems team at DuraMark Technologies. The company prints safety labels and branding decals — like the warning stickers you see on heavy machinery — at its production facility in Westfield, Ind. 

As they wait for DuraMark’s production to ramp back up to full capacity post-virus, business system analyst Eric Douglass and his team are tackling two projects that he believes will allow the company to perform better in its next chapter.


Making a mark

Douglass’s role at DuraMark includes customizing the software his company uses in order to make processes flow more efficiently. 

👉 He pinpointed two continuous improvement efforts to address issues that the production team encounters too often for his liking: 

  • Enhancing review procedures to limit errors when designing customer art for a customer 

  • Making changes to inventory put-away and order picking procedures – in other words, the putting-away and removing of inventory from the warehouse to improve order flow and reduce errors in order processing and shipping 

The past couple and next couple of months are a perfect time to tackle these issues, Douglass said. DuraMark’s production was down 30-50%, depending on the day in April, due to the coronavirus’s effect on its customer businesses. (DuraMark’s largest customers “are not making as many lawn mowers, lifts, trucks, fork lifts, power sprayers or other equipment” right now, he noted.)

With DuraMark’s production staff less hurried and thus more apt to, say, get acquainted with a new order-picking process, Douglass’s team starts to dream.

“What we look at right now is, ‘Okay, our production is down for most part, and we have time: What processes could we put in place now that we wouldn’t be able to put in place when we’re busy?'” he said. “... Now is a good time to make those types of changes that we’ve either been putting off or things that we haven’t thought about.”

“Okay, our production is down for most part, and we have time: What processes could we put in place now that we wouldn’t be able to put in place when we’re busy?” 


The “luxury” of time

Douglass’s team was working on solutions to those two issues — of custom art design flaws and inventory processing errors — before the coronavirus slowed production. However, the team might not have been able to introduce its solutions to the production line if it weren’t for the holdup.

👉 One of their solutions, for example, involves adding redundancy to the picking process. 

In other words, the team seeks to add an additional review mechanism to eliminate manual errors from the order processing and shipping processes.

In the new picking process, a DuraMark warehouse worker receives a customer’s order on a small, rectangular label. The worker picks the correct product from warehouse shelves, cross-referencing a printed order sheet to ensure he or she picked correctly. Finally, the warehouse’s fulfillment team checks both the label and order sheet before shipping the decals to the customer.

👉 It would’ve likely been impossible to train staff to follow this new process at DuraMark’s full production capacity, Douglass said. 

But because of the slowdown, he is hopeful it will happen sooner rather than later.

“Trying to institute a new picking process in the middle of craziness — our production manager would’ve put the kibosh on it pretty quickly,” he added. “So having at least the time to be able to talk about and possibly train [staff] on stuff like this is a luxury for what we do and how quickly we [usually] operate.”

"Having at least the time to be able to talk about and possibly train [staff] on [new processes] is a luxury for what we do."

Since production staff aren't as busy right now, DuraMark is making its label-printing processes more efficient.


Conserving cash

Douglass’s team is currently working from home. However, DuraMark’s production line has continued to run despite the coronavirus because some of its customers are considered essential businesses.

The company hasn’t furloughed or laid off any employees, Douglass said. The production staff who print, laminate, quality-check and ship DuraMark’s decals are working six feet apart and required to wear masks, he added. Workstations are sanitized hourly.

Some of DuraMark’s largest customers drastically reduced production or even closed facilities for several weeks. Others halted or slowed traditional production lines to start manufacturing essential medical equipment, like ventilators.

👉 On the finance side of DuraMark’s business, “We’ve had to institute some PO [purchase order] checks and balances that we normally don’t do,” Douglass said.

His team created a workflow to aid communication between the Purchasing and Finance teams on large purchase order requests.

“With enhanced focus on cash flow, the Finance team needed a way to monitor large purchase requests before we processed POs to our suppliers,” Douglass said. “We created some new rules that would notify Finance personnel immediately for any PO request over the threshold.”

Finance received an alert as soon as the PO request was entered. Upon approval, the PO was automatically sent to the supplier for processing.

What was “a fairly simple project improved communication and eased cash flow concerns,” Douglass said.

Though the process was initially instated as a short-term solution, the Purchasing and Finance teams plan to keep it in place permanently.

👉 DuraMark is also storing less inventory in its warehouse in another effort to improve cash flow.

The company makes many of its decals in-house on its own printing, laminating and cutting machines. Some specialty decals, due to material type, special features or size have to be purchased from third party specialists.

Typically, DuraMark strategically purchases these specialty items in bulk, then ships them out to the customer (i.e. an industrial manufacturer) in smaller pack sizes on-demand based on the customer’s production schedule. Currently, though, DuraMark might stock fewer of these items than usual, which is another reason why Finance and Purchasing continue to work closely in reviewing large purchase orders.

 “Say we outsource products for a customer and they generally order 200 units [from us] at a time,” Douglass said. “We may decide, based on price breaks, shipping and all that, to order 1,2000 units and ship them [to the customer] in quantities of 200. We may not want to stock up on 1,2000 right now ... because we probably won’t recoup that money anytime soon.” 

DuraMark is currently stocking fewer units of some items that it usually special-orders in bulk.


Getting back to business as usual

Douglass is hopeful that DuraMark’s customers will return to normal manufacturing levels for their lifts, fork trucks, power sprayers, lawn mowers, and other construction/agriculture equipment by the middle or end of May. That would put DuraMark’s return to “normal” somewhere in mid-summer.

“We’re always two to three weeks behind our customers: They produce, then three weeks later they run out of decals and call us,” he said. “[The return to normal production levels] is not going to be immediate for us. When states and businesses open back up, we likely won’t see an influx in volume until three weeks down the line.”

“We’re always two to three weeks behind our customers: They produce, then three weeks later they run out of decals and call us. ... When states and businesses open back up, we likely won’t see an influx in volume until three weeks down the line.”

Until then, his team is hard at work, aiming to implement its new processes while it has the attention of production staff.

Douglass acknowledged that he has the luxury of a different focus during the slowdown as compared to DuraMark’s C-suite: They’re inherently more concerned with the company’s finances while his role is to find opportunities to improve the processes and systems of the business as the coronavirus runs its course.

“From the operational side of things, we’re doing things now that we probably wouldn’t have been able to do so quickly,” he said. “Obviously, it comes at a price. But [the situation] is uncontrollable for all of us, so we just try and do what we can to make the best of it. … I think that ultimately, that will be helpful and we’ll come out of this stronger than before.”


🙋‍♀️ For more helpful information from Grow Wire and our friends at Brainyard and the NetSuite Blog, visit the Business Now Resource Guide.